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137th SOLRS conducts fuels training with 1st SOW

Men move a fuel hose back onto a truck

U.S. Airmen from the 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron (SOLRS) from Will Rogers Air National Guard Base, Oklahoma, and 1st SOLRS finish a refueling operation on an AC-130J Ghostrider July 27, 2021, at Hurlburt Field, Florida. Conducting both single-point refueling and over-the-wing refueling with the 1st Special Operations Wing airframes allowed the Airmen to train on Air Force Special Operations Command aircraft that they might encounter in operational environments. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Brigette Waltermire)

man holds beaker of cryogenic fluid

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jesse James, a 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron (SOLRS) fuels distribution operator stationed at Will Rogers Air National Guard Base, Oklahoma, holds a beaker containing a sample of liquid oxygen that will undergo odor and particulate testing at Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 28, 2021. The 137th SOLRS Airmen conducted annual training with their active-duty counterparts at the 1st SOLRS and gained valuable experience in operations like cryogenics that are required in their career field. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Brigette Waltermire)

Four men stand inside an above ground fuel tank

U.S. Airmen from the 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron (SOLRS) at Will Rogers Air National Guard Base, Oklahoma, tour a 1st SOLRS bulk fuel storage tank during annual training conducted at Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 27, 2021. It is not common to see the inside of a bulk fuel storage tank within the fuels career field as the tanks are only emptied of jet fuel for inspections once every 10 years. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Brigette Waltermire)

Four men observe screens

Richard Boudreaux, captain of the motor vessel Rhonda Lamulle, shows 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron Airmen the fuel barge monitoring system in the captain’s deck during a tour while delivering fuel to Hurlburt Field, July 28, 2021. The barge can hold 1 million gallons of fuel for receipt by multiple bases along the Gulf of Mexico. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Brigette Waltermire)

Five men tour the exterior of an above ground fuel storage tank

U.S. Airmen from the 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron (SOLRS) at Will Rogers Air National Guard Base, Oklahoma, tour a 1st SOLRS bulk fuel storage tank during annual training conducted at Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 27, 2021. Daily fuels operations at Will Rogers ANGB are conducted using fuel from underground storage facilities at Will Rogers World Airport, so the Airmen were able to gain knowledge and familiarization training on equipment their career field requires them to operate. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Brigette Waltermire)

A barge sits on the water

Members of the 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron tour motor vessel Rhonda Lamulle during a barge fuel receipt at Hurlburt Field, July 28, 2021. The barge can hold 1 million gallons of fuel for receipt by multiple bases along the Gulf of Mexico. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Brigette Waltermire)

A man moves a fuel hose

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Evan Brinegar, a 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron (SOLRS) fuels distribution operator stationed at Will Rogers Air National Guard Base, Oklahoma, straightens a fuel hose while refueling a U-28 Draco at Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 27, 2021. The 137th SOLRS Airmen conducted annual training with their active-duty counterparts at the 1st SOLRS. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Brigette Waltermire)

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. --

Three members of the 137th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron (SOLRS) attended training with the 1st Special Operations Wing to complete annual requirements July 26-30, 2021, at Hurlburt Field, Floria. 

The three Airmen received training on 1st SOLRS equipment that is not a part of their day-to-day operations at their home station, including bulk storage facilities, cryogenics, barge fuel receipts and defueling.

“Training at Hurlburt Field allows us to train alongside our AFSOC partners while also experiencing the unique equipment and mission capabilities of our active-duty counterparts,” said Senior Airman Jesse James, a 137th SOLRS fuels distribution operator. “They have a Forward Area Refueling Point crew, which is a very specialized area of the fuels career field. Most bases do not have this skillset, but as the only flight crew in fuels, this specialty has a global reach.”

The 1st SOLRS trained James, Senior Airman Aaron Blankenship and Senior Airman Evan Brinegar, also 137th SOLRS fuels distribution operators, as well as Airmen from two other wings: the 445th Logistics Readiness Squadron (LRS) from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and the 419th LRS from Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

“This training gives 1st SOLRS members more opportunities to network while working side-by-side with our total-force Airmen,” said Senior Master Sgt. John Dukes, the superintendent of the fuels management flight for the 1st SOLRS. “Training alongside fellow AFSOC wings can be even more beneficial because sharing the same warrior ethos means we collectively lean into our readiness stance to operate on shorter timelines. That mission connection is much closer for our AFSOC Airmen since they can watch it unfold in real time.”

Training conducted at other bases ensures 137th Special Operations Wing Airmen are exposed to operations and equipment that is different from their home station, meaning they walk away with a broader understanding of how operations impact different mission sets across the Air Force. Training at AFSOC bases allows them to see the broader spectrum of the mission they already support.

“I’m looking forward to returning to my shop with new knowledge and experiences to help other Airmen’s professional development,” said Blankenship. “It’s an opportunity to foster a greater awareness of another AFSOC base as well as experience multiple aircraft and other capabilities that I might encounter on a deployment.”